Clean Up Our Oceans

“If we were logical, the future would be bleak, indeed.
But we are more than logical. We are human beings,
and we have faith, and we have hope, and we can work.”
Jacques Yves Cousteau

Ocean Clean Up

Boyan Slat stands before thousands of pounds of ocean garbage.

There’s an amazing 20-year-old Dutch by the name of Boyan Slat who is on a mission. He’s had this mission since he was 16-years old when he first was exposed to ocean garbage during a diving vacation in Greece. The teenager was stunned to see that there was more plastic on the beaches than fishes in the sea.

He was in college on his way to becoming an Aerospace Engineer, but he could never erase the images of the plastic debris from his mind. Slat dropped out of college and established The Ocean Cleanup Foundation. Its mission is to create an environmentally friendly large-scale and efficient way to remove the trillions of pieces of plastic polluting aquatic ecosystems and killing our marine life. Plastic debris that kills about a million seabirds and over one hundred thousand marine animals each year.

The way the Foundation plans to clean up the oceans is by using a system of strategically placed floating barriers that will collect the plastic brought in by the ocean currents, similar to how the waves bring garbage to shore. Since the system does not require nets, there is no chance of harming wildlife in the process.

He even has plans for all the collected plastic. It will be recycled into oil, which can be sold to help offset some of the costs associated with the project.

When most 20-year-olds don’t even know what they plan to do with their life, this young passionate entrepreneur is already making his impact on the world. What started as an outlandish dream by one determined teenage, may actually come to fruition. A dream to successfully clean up our oceans.

Shine On

 

Yellow Submarine

“The sea, the great unifier, is man’s only hope.
Now, as never before, the old phrase
has a literal meaning:
We are all in the same boat.”
Jacques Cousteau

Jacques Cousteau on-board the Calypso.

One of my passions that began as a child is my love for the sea and all its forms of life. Growing up in the midwestern United States, the largest area of water I knew were the great lakes.

Having never seen an ocean in person, I was first introduced to the sea by watching the 1950s TV show, Sea Hunt starring Lloyd Bridges.

When my family relocated to California in the mid 1960s, I remember the first day we drove to Zuma Beach. I couldn’t wait to jump into the water. Unfortunately, it was during a riptide and I nearly drown.

My respect for the sea and it’s power grew more towards what was in the ocean and not actually being in the water. So, during the late 1960s to the 1980s I whet my appetite for the sea by watching The Undersea World of Jacques Cousteau. I was hooked on this exciting new documentary style show. I fell in love with the interesting Frenchman in the red bonnet with his charming personality and beautiful ship the Calypso.

Yellow Submarine

Jacques Cousteau with his Yellow Submarine.

Every week Jacques Cousteau this french ex-naval officer, explorer, conservationist, scientist and researcher with his mesmerizing voice would take me on an incredible journey exploring the depths of oceans around the world.

Jacques Cousteau died 25 June 1997, but he left us with a plethora of films, books and research that paved the way for current oceanographers and scientist.

I miss you Jacques Cousteau and all that you gave us, including that wonderful yellow submarine.

Shine On