LeRoy Neiman

“It’s a nice feeling to go out in the world and
look for excellence – the best in man.
My subject is very valid.
It’s about people, and about life.”
LeRoy Neiman

There’s an artist that I’ve admired for over forty years. He was an American artist famous for his breathtaking energetic images. His brilliantly colored, expressionist paintings and screen prints of athletes, celebrities, musicians, leisure activities, Playboy illustrations, and sporting events made him one of the most popular artist in the United States.

Leroy Neiman’s artistic style is familiar to a remarkably broad spectrum of Americans –rich and poor, black and white, urban and rural, educated and illiterate, and young and old alike. He was the official artist at five Olympiads.

Back in the 1970s, I received a large coffee table book, LeRoy Neiman: Art & Life Style. Whenever I feel like relaxing and looking at beautiful works of art, I will sit down with a cup of herbal tea and enjoy the majestic work of LeRoy Neiman.

Shine On

Just a few more samples of Neiman’s work.

Hope For Tomorrow

“Learn from yesterday,
live for today,
hope for tomorrow.
The important thing is
not to stop questioning.”
                                                                                   Albert Einstein

Shine On

Uke Music Moments

“Every song is like a painting.”
Dick Dale

I’ve been listening to a lot of my favorite ukulele music. One of the song’s I’m really enjoying is Misirlou. This song gained popularity in 1962 when Dick Dale performed it as an American surf rock version.

The version I like is performed by The Ukulele Orchestra of Great Britain. I’m sure all of you are familiar with this song performed by The Beach Boys and Dick Dale and his Del-Tones version in the movie, Pulp Fiction. But you may not of heard it played by a ukulele orchestra.

Hope you enjoy this uke music moment.

Shine On

Bird Man of Our Century

 

“A bird’s experience is far richer,
complex, and thoughtful than I’d imagined.”
David Allen Sibley

 

Birdman of the New Millennium
In a previous blog post I wrote about The Bird Man of America, John James Audubon. However, it appears there’s a new bird man of America artist that has been painting and studying birds for over 50 years. He has been called the most important illustrator of birds since Audubon.

David Allen Sibley, ornithologist, self-taught artist and author was born and raised in Plattsburgh, New York. His love of birds began at the age of eight years old while hiking with his father, Fred Sibley, famous ornithologist at Yale University.

Often after hiking with his dad, David would sketch all the different birds he had encountered from memory. His bird-watching hobby became a life-long passion. Much so, that he dropped out of college at Cornell University to pursue the study of birds.

Through the past five decades, Sibley has drawn and painted thousands of species of birds. His love of birds and painting them has never wavered. It was his goal to one day publish a field guide book for other bird watchers. With encouragement from his wife, also an ornithologist, he spent 14 years traveling, researching and painting birds for the book.

His hard work paid off and his goal was achieved in 2000, when his first book, The Sibley Field Guide to Birds was published. Shortly after publication, his first volume was on the New York best seller list and David followed up that book with numerous other popular guide books.

Even after half a century of bird-watching, David Sibley continues to study and learn new things about his favorite topic. When he did research for his recent book, What’s It’s Like to Be a Bird, he became convinced of something he had not previously anticipated: “Birds routinely make complex decisions and experience emotions”. In this book, he also covers such topics as; Do birds have a good sense of smell? Where do birds go at night? Where do they sleep?

With over 8.7 million species of birds throughout the entire world, I’m pretty sure his latest bird book won’t be the last for this bird man of our century.

Shine On